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Program builds up leadership, grades

In the safe, supportive environment of Neighborhood Network programs, Betsy Williams sees children and youth improve their grades and develop leadership skills.  She also sees their low-income families improve their lives through participation in Neighborhood Networks programs.

These programs are offered for people living in multi-family housing through Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to improve self-sufficiency and access to technology.

In 1995, Neighborhood Networks was started by HUD nationally to build economic, health, education and personal self-sufficiency for low- to moderate-income families.

 “We seek to make workers, critical thinkers, studiers, helpers, engineers and doctors, to teach them to work with little and they will have much,”. .. .. .  . . .read more

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